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Muscle Response Testing & Applied Kinesiology

Muscle Response Testing can help a practitioner evaluate the imbalances in your bodily functions. It is a form of analysis based on the belief that various muscles are linked to particular organs, glands & systems in the body. Any weakness in a muscle upon testing can signal distant internal problems.

To the practitioner, the body functions as an integrated whole & must be tested as such. Since the whole is greater than the sum of its parts, the practitioner is able to make sense of the vague complaints the client comes in with “I just don’t feel well” even though all of my blood results and other tests are normal. Or I’m having digestive issues, however, my endoscopy & colonoscopy results are all normal.

 

Using your muscles to test for imbalances in your body, creates a bio-feedback loop. This theory of Applied Kinesiology was developed by George Goodheart Jr in 1964.  It helps the practitioner present a fairly accurate picture of how your glands, organs, major systems, muscles and bone structure are working. The practitioner can then make a clinical correlations with his/her findings and the clients symptoms.

 

This technique also allows a practitioner to determine exactly what nutrients, vitamins, minerals, herbs etc, is best suited for your body. It allows the practitioner to create a roadmap and to tailor make a program  for the client.

What To Expect During A Consultation.

Firstly the practitioner goes through a detailed history, diet, and reviews any blood results you may have, and then does the muscle testing.

If the muscle selected for the testing remains strong upon the pressure applied to it, it’s deemed “strong” or “locked”. When it becomes weak upon pressure being applied are considered “weak” or “unlocked” and are an indication of an imbalance or problem.

This same method is used to determine whether certain herbs, nutrients & foods are contributing to the wellbeing of your body.

This method removes any guesswork for the practitioner.