BERBERINE FOR YOUR HEART - FEBRUARY 2019 - VOLUME 10, ISSUE 11

Ramila's Health Tips
 

Volume 10, Issue 11

February 2019

Berberine for Your Heart

February is generally noted for Valentine's Day and matters of the heart - including heart health. This month, I'd like to focus on a supplement that has many heart/cardiovascular health benefits, as well as a substantial number of other beneficial effects - berberine. Read on below...

These newsletters will help you make better choices for better health. The choices that you make today can either have a positive or negative impact on your overall health. Begin by choosing better as it is a step towards longevity.

Ramila Padiachy

Doctor of Natural Medicine (DNM)®

Ramila
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berberine

Berberine

What is berberine? Berberine is a yellowish alkaloid found in several plants, including European barberry, goldenseal, Chinese goldthread, Oregon grape, phellodendron (cork tree) and tree turmeric.  

Berberine has long been a part of traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine, but the western world is just beginning to be aware of it.

Type 2 diabetes

You may have heard of it as a remedy for type 2 diabetes; in fact Nature's Sunshine describes its berberine as follows: 

"Berberine IR naturally supports healthy blood glucose levels by up-regulating enzymes that trigger blood glucose metabolism. Utilizing a time-honoured ingredient found in both Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Ayurvedic medicine, Berberine IR works to support blood sugar balance and glucose metabolism through a unique cellular action. Berberine, a constituent of certain plants, helps activate a key enzyme that supports blood glucose metabolism, turning your cells from “idle” to “on” and helping them to use glucose efficiently." 

One study compared taking 500 mg of berberine 2 to 3 times daily for 3 months with taking the common diabetes drug metformin. Berberine was able to control blood sugar and lipid metabolism as effectively as metformin, with the researchers describing it as a "potential oral hypoglycemic agent with beneficial effects on lipid metabolism."

Other health effects of berberine

There is an increasing amount of research showing that berberine can do much more than help to regulate blood glucose levels. These additional benefits include (but are not limited to):

Helps with healthy weight management

In addition to a healthy diet and regular exercise, berberine can help you maintain a healthy weight. It helps to activate adenosine monophosphate-activate kinase (AMPK), also known as the body's "metabolic master switch". AMPK is responsible for kick-starting your metabolism and encouraging your body to burn the calories it takes in, rather than storing them as fat.

Supports heart health

Maintaining healthy blood sugar levels and losing weight will help to improve your cardiovascular health, but berberine has even more heart health benefits. It promotes healthy blood pressure by encouraging the natural release of nitric oxide, enabling blood flow. (See our February 2013 newsletter for additional information about nitric oxide.)

Berberine has also been shown to reduce serum cholesterol levels, including LDL cholesterol, as well as triglyceride levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. It may also help to increase levels of HDL (high density lipoprotein), the 'good' cholesterol.

Treats SIBO (small intestine bacterial overgrowth)

People who suffer from SIBO symptoms have excessive bacteria in their small intestines. Conventional treatment of SIBO is limited to antibiotics, with a variable response rate. Berberine, together with digestive enzymes, is helpful in reducing bacterial overgrowth. Berberine exerts selective antimicrobial action against a wide range of disease causing organisms linked to SIBO, yet exerts no action against health-promoting species.

Increases immune health

Berberine may help improve immune function by maintaining healthy gut flora, providing antioxidant properties and activating white blood cells, which are responsible for inhibiting infections. The majority of your immune system (about 70 percent) is in your gut, so it makes sense that berberine's ability to minimize the bad bacteria while promoting beneficial strains would help your immune system.

Helps control non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)

Research suggests that berberine may be a useful supplement for people with NAFLD, because it helps decrease fat buildup in the liver and regulate hepatic lipid metabolism.

Possible additional benefits of berberine - more study needed:

  • May help ease depression and anxiety.
  • May promote optimal joint health.
  • May assist in improving memory, spatial learning and overall cognitive functioning, as well as with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease.
  • May help to maintain healthy lung function

Some authors have compared berberine to curcumin for its effectiveness in so many different aspects of our health. I encourage you to keep it in mind!

 

References

  1. Price A. Berberine: the plant alkaloid that helps treat diabetes & digestive problems. draxe.com/berberine/ August 2, 2018, Accessed January 14, 2019.
  2. Berberine and its many benefits. enzymedica.com/blogs/naturaldigestivehealth/berberine-and-its-many-benefits February 24, 2018. Accessed January 14, 2019.
  3. Mercola J. Berberine helps boost your mitochondrial and metabolic health. articles.mercola.com/vitamins-supplements/berberine.aspx Accessed January 14, 2019.
  4. Nature's Sunshine website naturessunshine.com/ca/product/berberine-ir-90-caps/1398/ Accessed January 31, 2019.
  5. Yin J, Xing H, Ye J. Efficacy of berberine in patients with type 2 diabetes. Metabolism 2008;57(5):712-717.
  6. Zhang Y, Li X, Zou D et al. Treatment of type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia with the natural plant alkaloid berberine. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2008;93:2559-2565.
  7. Murray M. What is SIBO? And what can help? enzymedica.com/blogs/naturaldigestivehealth/what-is-sibo-and-what-can-help July 24, 2018. Accessed January 14, 2019.
  8. Jiang WH, Li SH, Li XH. Therapeutic potential of berberine against neurodegenerative diseases. Sci China Life Sci 2015;58(6):564-569.

Disclaimer: The suggestions and recommendations in this newsletter are not intended to be prescriptive or diagnostic. The information is accurate and up to date to our knowledge, but we are not responsible for any errors in our sources of information.

Supplements

There are some Nature's Sunshine supplements that would help you to maximize your health. You can find information about these products and purchase them in our online store:

  • Berberine
  • Grapine
  • Zambroza
Berberine IR

For additional information, please email info@ramilas.com or call Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic at 613.829.0427 for an appointment. Please continue letting friends and family know about this newsletter. Also, on our website, please see back issues of this newsletter, information about services, products and our clinic, and order products.

The Belly of the Beast

AVAILABLE NOW

thebellyofthebeast.ca

1437 Woodroffe Avenue

Ottawa ON (map)

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WAYS TO KEEP YOUR HEART HEALTHY - FEBRUARY 2018 - VOLUME 9, ISSUE 10

 
 

Volume 9, Issue 10

Ways to Keep Your Heart Healthy

I hope you had a really happy Valentine's day! We've looked at different aspects of heart health in a few February newsletters. However, there are still some aspects of heart health we have not touched on before. Read on below...

These newsletters will help you make better choices for better health. The choices that you make today can either have a positive or negative impact on your overall health. Begin by choosing better as it is a step toward longevity.

Ramila Padiachy

Doctor of Natural Medicine (DNM)®

Ramila
 

A brief review of ways to keep your heart healthy


Maintain a healthy lifestyle:

  • Eat a healthy diet, eat 'real food' - avoid added sugars, other refined carbohydrates, trans fats, processed foods.  
  • Antioxidants are heart-healthy.
  • Dark chocolate is cardioprotective; note the emphasis on dark, and enjoy in moderation.
  • Be physically active.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Get adequate, good quality sleep.
  • Laugh - be sure to focus on things you enjoy and laugh every day.
  • Don't smoke.
  • If you drink alcohol, be sure to drink moderately (no more than one or two drinks per day).
  • Practice gratitude - it's linked to better health, including heart health.
  • Avoid inflammation, including practicing good dental hygiene (plus a healthy diet, good stress management, physical activity and enough sleep).

Additional ways to promote heart health


In our October 2017 newsletter, we discussed stress management techniques in relation to reducing inflammation caused by mental stress. These techniques are also relevant to reducing our risk of heart disease (which can be the result of inflammation).


In addition to a healthy lifestyle, we looked at counselling, such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), as an effective way to reduce stress. We also looked at relaxation techniques including:

  1. deep breathing exercises
  2. progressive muscle relaxation, often combined with deep breathing
  3. meditation - the goal is to quiet your mind; you can start by simply observing your thoughts
  4. listening to music - soothing music can decrease blood pressure, heart rate and anxiety levels

You can find more information on relaxation techniques in my book, thebellyofthebeast.ca

Mindfulness

Mindfulness has been receiving attention recently as having an important connection to a healthy heart.


Mindfulness has been defined as the ability to attend non-judgmentally to one's own physical and mental processes; or paying attention to what you're doing in the present moment. "Dispositional mindfulness" is a person's awareness and attention to what they are thinking and feeling in the present moment.


In the New England Family Study of 382 participants, those with higher mindfulness scores had an 83% greater prevalence of good cardiovascular health. Those with lower mindfulness scores had difficulty with 4 of 7 cardiovascular indicators; namely body mass index, physical activity, fasting glucose and cigarette smoking.


What is a possible mechanism for these associations? It has been suggested that people who are more mindful have a greater awareness of their behavioural routines, and the factors driving the behaviour. Because they pay greater attention to their behaviours, they have improved abilities to initiate or prevent the particular behaviour itself.


The authors caution this is a preliminary, cross-sectional analysis, and that further longitudinal studies could evaluate whether mindfulness-based interventions consistently improve cardiovascular risk factors and outcomes.


Looking at this issue further in a review article, the authors found "promising but still inconclusive" evidence of associations of mindfulness with cardiovascular health and CVD (cardiovascular disease) risk factors, specifically smoking, blood pressure, diabetes, physical activity, obesity and diet. Customized mindfulness interventions could eventually be developed as the mechanisms affecting the results are more clearly understood. This is consistent with the findings of the New England Family Study and will be an interesting topic to follow as more research is conducted.

Pet ownership

Another way to promote heart health may be to own a pet - but I would caution you this is only a good idea if you're committed to taking care of a pet, and loving the pet you would choose. Studies suggest that owning a pet may help improve your heart and lung function, as well as lower your risk of dying from heart disease.


A recent study also suggests that owning a dog may result in less heart disease and longer life. The 12-year study followed 3.4 million Swedish adults aged 40 to 80. The researchers found that dog owners had a lower risk of death due to heart disease, and the benefit was especially evident in people who (otherwise) lived alone, compared to single people who didn't own dogs. Dogs may ease stress, loneliness and depression, and inspire people to be more active and socially connected - all factors that seem to promote heart health. However, there could be other reasons for the findings; perhaps healthier people, or those who are making the kinds of lifestyle changes that reduce heart risk, are more likely to have a dog than people in poorer health.

The American Heart Association published a scientific statement on pet ownership and cardiovascular risk, and concluded that pet ownership, particularly dog ownership, may have some causal role in reducing CVD risk. However, it cautions that pet adoption, rescue or purchase should not be done for the primary purpose of reducing CVD risk.

I hope you find these tips helpful - here's to a heart-healthy 2018!

 

References

Disclaimer: The suggestions and recommendations in this newsletter are not intended to be prescriptive or diagnostic. The information is accurate and up to date to our knowledge, but we are not responsible for any errors in our sources of information.

Supplements

There are some Nature's Sunshine supplements that are relevant to cardiovascular health. You can find information about these products and purchase them in our online store:

  • Arginine Plus Mixed Berry
  • Blood Pressurex
  • Capsicum
  • CoQ10
  • Flax Seed Oil
  • Ginkgo & Hawthorn
  • Ginkgo Biloba Extract
  • Grapine
  • Green Tea Extract
  • Hawthorn
  • HS-C
  • I-X
  • Lecithin
  • MC
  • Oregon Grape Extract
  • Pantothenic Acid
  • Red Clover
  • Super Omega 3
  • Vitamin D3
  • Vitamin E with Selenium
  • Zambroza
Passion Flower

“I had my first visit to a holistic clinic for a very bad sinus infection and I am so pleased I went to see Ramila. After 2 weeks of congestion, followed by 3 days of complete blockage and body aches, I was 90% better in 48 hours. My respiratory health was fully restored in just 4 days, with no recurrence of symptoms. I am amazed with the results and although maintain my health through proper nutrition and exercise, its comforting to know I can count on Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic for natural treatments. Thank you.”

-Valarie L

For additional information, please email info@ramilas.com or call Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic at 613.829.0427 for an appointment. Please continue letting friends and family know about this newsletter. Also, on our website, please see back issues of this newsletter, information about services, products and our clinic, and order products.

The Belly of the Beast

AVAILABLE NOW

thebellyofthebeast.ca

1437 Woodroffe Avenue

Ottawa ON (map)

Facebook info@ramilas.comWebsite

HOW CAN RESVERATROL IMPROVE OUR HEALTH? - JANUARY 2017 - VOLUME 8, ISSUE 10

 

Ramilas Health Tips

Ramila's Healing Arts Clinic

 

Happy New Year! I hope you had an enjoyable, safe and healthy holiday, and that you're making great progress with your new year's resolutions!

 

February is just around the corner and, of course, Valentine's Day, which is very much related to heart health. In recent years, there has been a lot of publicity concerning the heart health effects of resveratrol, a compound found mainly in grapes and red wine, as well as in raspberries, plums, grape tomatoes, acai berries, pomegranates, cocoa and peanuts. I thought it would be interesting to look at the available evidence that resveratrol is heart-healthy.

 
These newsletters will help you make better choices for better health. The choices that you make today can either have a positive or negative impact on your overall health. Begin by choosing better. It is a step toward longevity.

clinic

Volume 8, Issue 10

Ramila Padiachy

Doctorate of Natural Medicine (DNM)®

Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic

1437 Woodroffe Avenue
Ottawa ON (map)

613.829.0427
info@ramilas.com

 

Like us on Facebook

How Can Resveratrol Improve Our Health?

What is resveratrol? It is a polyphenol, which is a type of antioxidant, found in grape skins (but not in grape seeds), and particularly in red grape skins (as well as other foods listed above in the introduction).

 

Can resveratrol benefit your cardiovascular health?


There has been interest in resveratrol's role in heart health ever since a meta-analysis found a significant risk reduction associated with drinking 1-2 glasses of wine daily.

 

Researchers believe that chronic inflammation may be at the root of heart disease. Inflammation can cause blood clotting; the clots can then block the blood flow to your heart leading to heart disease and possibly a heart attack. Resveratrol is believed to reduce inflammation, leading to increased heart health. Resveratrol may also help to lower LDL ("bad" cholesterol). Note that it might interact with blood thinners like Coumadin, as well as medications like aspirin and ibuprofen, and increase the chance of bleeding.

 

It is believed that resveratrol enables the walls of blood vessels to relax; this tends to be impaired in people with chronic heart disease, and resveratrol may reverse or reduce this impairment.

 

Since type 2 diabetes is closely related to cardiovascular health, it's worth mentioning that resveratrol appears to help reduce insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes.

 

Thus it appears that resveratrol is effective at protecting the heart and blood flow, and may be an insulin sensitizer.

 

There is interest in the effect of resveratrol on exercise, and, of course, fitness is related to heart health. A comprehensive review of the literature concluded it is clear resveratrol has positive effects on muscle function and antioxidant activity, as well as carbohydrate metabolism and bone metabolism. Therefore, it is definitely correlated with exercise; it will be interesting to follow further research on this topic.

 

Resveratrol appears to increase the activity of mitochondria, which produce energy within cells; this could potentially extend the cells' lives. This may explain resveratrol's popularity as an anti-aging compound. It also appears to stimulate cellular proteins known as sirtuins; this is believed to promote longer cell life.

One Powerful Juice: ZAMBROZA

Nature’s Sunshine's Zambroza is a combination of 14 of the most healthful fruits and extracts gathered from around the world. Zambroza’s ingredients are rich in bioflavonoids, polyphenols and antioxidants. Zambroza has been independently tested by New Brunswick Laboratories to deliver a high ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) value. Among Zambroza’s key ingredients is mangosteen, which contains the greatest known supply of highly-researched, polyphenolic compounds called xanthones. Other ingredients of note are acai berry, pomegranate, wolfberry (goji berry), raspberry, grape skin and seed extract, sea buckthorn and many more. You can purchase Zambroza at our online store.

 

Research shows these ingredients may support:

  • ZambrozaAnti-aging
  • Heart health
  • Memory and motor skills
  • Diabetes
  • Colds, flu and sore throat
  • Normalization of menstruation
  • Normal blood pressure
  • Eyesight
  • Improved immune system
  • Fatigue
  • Skin problems
  • Urinary tract concerns
  • Pain relief

What's the relevance of resveratrol to Valentine's Day?

We all know that chocolate is an important feature of Valentine's Day.

 

You've probably also heard that chocolate contains beneficial flavonols. However, you might not know that resveratrol is one of them, and that chocolate (cocoa) contains significant levels of resveratrol (although not quite as much as red wine).

 

So, chocolate, particularly dark chocolate, is a tasty alternative (or addition) to red wine as a source of resveratrol. Enjoy!

Supplements

There are some Nature's Sunshine supplements that are relevant to this newsletter. You can find information about these products and purchase them in our online store:

  • Zambroza
  • Arginine Plus with Mixed Berry
  • CHOLESTER REG II
  • SUPER TRIO

For additional information, email info@ramilas.com or call Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic at 613.829.0427 for an appointment. Please continue letting friends and family know about this newsletter. Visit our website where you can see back issues of this newsletter, information about services and our clinic, and order products.

 

References:

Disclaimer: The suggestions and recommendations in this newsletter are not intended to be prescriptive or diagnostic. The information is accurate and up to date to our knowledge, but we are not responsible for any errors in our sources of information.

“Ramila’s promise that I would be well has proven true. With all my heart, I thank her and Megs for their dedication to their healing arts and to their clients, and for their knowledge and loving service."

- Jennifer B.

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When health begins, dis-ease ends.

 

HOW TO KEEP YOUR HEART HEALTHY - FEBRUARY 2016 - VOLUME 7, ISSUE 11

Ramilas Health Tips

Ramila's Healing Arts Clinic

I hope you had a happy Valentine's day! While our attention is on the heart this month, here are some tips for keeping your heart healthy. Some of them may surprise you! Read on below...

 

These newsletters will help you make better choices for better health. The choices that you make today can either have a positive or negative impact on your overall health. Begin by choosing better. It is a step toward longevity.

 

clinic

Volume 7, Issue 11

Ramila Padiachy

Doctorate of Natural Medicine (DNM)®

 

Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic

1437 Woodroffe Avenue
Ottawa ON (map)

613.829.0427
info@ramilas.com

Like us on Facebook

How to Keep your Heart Healthy

A healthy lifestyle will keep your heart healthier. You may find it easier to take some small steps rather than trying to make more major changes - it's always better to start somewhere than do nothing. Here are some small steps that will help you get started:

  • Take a 10 minute walk. If you don't exercise at all, a short walk is a great way to start. You can gradually take longer walks as you get more fit.
  • Give yourself a lift. Lifting a hardcover book or a 2 pound weight a few times a day can help tone your arms and, when that becomes easy (or if it already is easy), you can gradually lift heavier items.
  • Eat one extra fruit or vegetable a day. Fruits and vegetables are good for your entire body, and are inexpensive.
  • Stop drinking your calories. Cutting out just one sugar-sweetened soft drink or high calorie latte can easily save you 100 calories per day. Over a year, that amounts to a 10-pound weight loss.
  • Have a handful of nuts. Walnuts, almonds, peanuts and other nuts are good for your heart. They are a great substitute for chips or cookies, and are delicious in salads for a tasty crunch.
  • Eat fish and seafood instead of red meat once or twice a week. It's good for the heart, the brain and the waistline.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. It protects your heart because flu, pneumonia and other infections can be very hard on the heart.
  • Breathe deeply. Try breathing slowly and deeply for a few minutes a day. It can help you relax, fall asleep, and lower blood pressure.
  • Count your blessings. Make a point of writing down 5 things for which you are grateful every day. Gratitude is linked to better health, longer life and greater well-being, whereas chronic anger, worry and hostility contribute to high blood pressure and heart disease.

 

Up your Game

Of course, there are several more major steps you can take:

  • Give up smoking (both 'real' and electronic). Did you know that smoking kills more people from heart disease than lung cancer? A year after you quit, your risk of a heart attack falls to about half that of a smoker.
  • Get enough, good quality sleep. In one study, people who slept 7 hours per night had less calcium in their arteries (an early sign of heart disease) than people who slept 5 hours or less or those who slept 9 hours or more. Seven to 8 hours is recommended.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. The easiest way to know if you need to slim down is to calculate your body mass index (BMI). This, as you may know, is based on your weight in relation to your height. You can easily find websites that will do the calculation for you. You're considered overweight if your BMI is 25-29.9, and a BMI of 30 or more is considered 'obese'. Your risk of heart disease increases as your BMI increases from 25 on up.
  • Get active. Aim for 30 minutes a day of exercise at least as vigorous as brisk walking, 5 days a week.
  • Keep the pressure off. Get your blood pressure checked regularly. Many people are able to keep their blood pressure in the healthy range by following an eating plan, such as the DASH diet or the Mediterranean diet. Of course, physical activity, sleep and managing stress are also very important.
  • Avoid inflammation. In particular, good dental hygiene helps prevent inflammation from spreading from the mouth to the rest of the body, including the heart, where it can contribute to heart disease.
  • Avoid trans fats. Look for hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated fats on labels and stay away from them! Many still believe that we also need to avoid saturated fats, but there is increasing evidence that they are not a problem. For example, in Sweden, the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (heart attack) has been going down even as butter sales have more than doubled. Researchers at Cambridge University have found that saturated fat does not cause heart disease, while so-called 'healthy' polyunsaturated fats do not prevent cardiovascular problems.
  • Eat plenty of fibre - at least 30 g a day to lower your risk of heart disease. Fruit and vegetables are an ideal source, as well as whole grains, such as oats, brown rice and, if you're not sensitive to gluten, whole wheat and bran.
  • Salt - it can actually be dangerous to cut down too much on salt. Research has shown that patients with heart failure who cut down on their salt intake were 85% more likely to die or require hospitalization that those who did not. What's important is the type of salt you consume. Himalayan salt or sea salt that contains other minerals is healthy, whereas refined salt that contains only sodium is much less healthy.  
  • Alcohol - one or 2 drinks may be fine, but more can increase blood pressure.
  • Dark chocolate is cardioprotective, including lowering blood pressure, improving lipid profile, and helping prevent atrial fibrillation. It is also anti-diabetic, anti-thrombotic, anti-inflammatory, slows progression of periodontitis, improves exercise endurance, protects vision, neuroprotective, reduces stress hormones, and is anti-carcinogenic. Quite an impressive list! But do note that the emphasis is on dark chocolate, and unprocessed chocolate is better than processed. Enjoy! In moderation, of course.
  • And finally, "don't worry, be happy". Laughing reduces stress which improves heart function. Researchers have found that people with heart disease are 40% less likely to laugh compared to other people the same age without heart disease. Make a point of focusing on things you enjoy and make you laugh every day.

 

Supplements

GrapineThere are a number of Nature's Sunshine supplements that can help with heart health. You can find information about these products and purchase them in our online store:

  • Arginine plus mixed berry
  • CardioxLDL
  • CoQ10 - 50 or 100 mg
  • Grapine
  • Bloodpressurex
  • Super Omega 3
  • Vitamin E with Selenium
  • Psyllium
  • Psyllium Hulls
  • Vitamin D3
  • Zambroza

For additional information, please email ramila@ramilas.com or call Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic at 613.829.0427 for an appointment. Please continue letting friends and family know about this newsletter. Also, on our website, please see back issues of this newsletter, information about services, products and our clinic, and order products.

References:

  1. 10 small steps for better heart health. Healthbeat. health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/10-small-steps-for-better-heart-health Accessed February 8, 2016.
  2. Top 10 healthy heart tips. nhs.uk/Livewell/Healthyhearts/Pages/Healthy-heart-tips.aspx  Accessed February 8, 2016.
  3. MacMillan A. 10 tips for better heart health. WebMD  webmd.com/heart/features/12-tips-for-better-heart-health Accessed February 16, 2016.  
  4. Eenfeldt A. Dramatically improved heart health in Sweden! In: Heart Disease, Saturated Fat. November 24, 2014. dietdoctor.com/dramatically-improved-heart-health-in-sweden Accessed February 8, 2016.
  5. Knapton S. No link found between saturated fat and heart disease. The Telegraph. telegraph.co.uk/journalists/sarah-knapton/10703970/No-link-found-between-saturated-fat-and-heart-disease.html Accessed February 8, 2016.
  6. Mercola J. Reducing salt intake might harm heart failure patients, study claims. February 8, 2016. articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/02/08/salt-intake-heart-failure.aspx
  7. Mercola J. The amazing health benefit of dark chocolate. February 8, 2016. articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/02/08/amazing-health-benefits-dark-chocolate.aspx
  8. How to improve daily heart function. wikihow.com/Improve-Daily-Heart-Function Accessed February 8, 2016.

Disclaimer: The suggestions and recommendations in this newsletter are not intended to be prescriptive or diagnostic. The information is accurate and up to date to our knowledge, but we are not responsible for any errors in our sources of information.

 

Iridology Analysis


A non-invasive diagnostic tool used in alternative medicine, this alternative medical test is based on the theory that the iris reflects a person's well being. Practitioners use eye health to both diagnose your current state of health and predict future health problems.

 

Find out more.

It’s amazing how Ramila can study your eye and know what’s going on in your body. It’s only been a few months but I feel I have better control over my body. My energy is up, my stress level is down and my immune system is working better.

- Jan F.

 

When health begins, dis-ease ends.

Cardiovascular - February 2012 - Volume 3 Issue 10

Best wishes for a Happy Valentine’s Day! I think February is an appropriate month for an update on heart health. Two years ago (see Newsletter, February 2010) I reviewed several risk factors for heart disease and also discussed how you can minimize or reduce your risk of heart disease. This month I’ll provide recent updates regarding heart disease and stroke.
Read More

Fats - April 2009 - Volume 1 Issue 2

This is the second monthly newsletter, and like the first, it deals with nutrition - specifically the different types of fat in our diet. However, the newsletters will deal with a wide range of topics, including disease prevention, physical activity, aging well and many other subjects. You can contact me at ramila@ramilas.com. I welcome your comments and suggestions! For many years, researchers focused on the total amount of fat in the diet, but now it's clear that the type of fat we eat is more important to heart health, and many other aspects of our health, than just the overall amount. Every living cell in the body needs essential fatty acids (polyunsaturated fats). They are essential for rebuilding and producing new cells. They are also necessary for the production and balance of prostaglandins, hormone-like substances, which regulate all body systems and functions, including the cardiovascular, immune, reproductive, and central nervous systems. Essential fatty acids are found in high amounts in the brain where they assist in the transmission of nerve impulses; they are necessary for normal brain function. Japanese researchers have verified that a deficiency of essential fatty acids can result in an impaired ability to learn and recall information.
Read More