THE IMPORTANCE OF GOOD GUT HEALTH - DECEMBER 2017 - VOLUME 9, ISSUE 9

 
 

Volume 9, Issue 9

The Importance of Good Gut Health

I hope you're enjoying a happy, healthy holiday season and enjoying the delicious food that's so abundant at this time of year! I'm not about to tell you not to eat your favourite foods; only to avoid foods you are sensitive to, or that you can't digest. But I thought you might appreciate a few tips to keep your gut healthy. Read on below...

These newsletters will help you make better choices for better health. The choices that you make today can either have a positive or negative impact on your overall health. Begin by choosing better as it is a step toward longevity.

Best wishes for a relaxed, healthy and happy holiday season!

Ramila Padiachy

Doctor of Natural Medicine (DNM)®

Ramila

The Belly Of The Beast is now available at thebellyofthebeast.ca

Download the free recipe book, as well, for some healthy new recipes to try over the holidays.

The Importance of Good Gut Health


We recently looked at the importance of a healthy gut (see our newsletter of June 2017 on the microbiome), but I thought it would be helpful to summarize a few key points here.

  • Good gut health is essential to maintain a strong immune system. Beneficial microbes help prevent disease.
  • The microbes in the gut (microbiome) are responsible for the breakdown and absorption of nutrients.
  • The gut is known as our second brain. It has its own nervous system, the enteric nervous system which is connected to the central nervous system by the vagus nerve. Thus the gut can transmit information to the brain. For example, it can affect our mood, weight, and hormone levels depending on its health and what we eat.

Maintain a Healthy Gut During the Holiday Season


Even at this time of year, a healthy gut is really very important. Hippocrates is frequently quoted as saying, "All disease begins in the gut." More than 2000 years ago, he understood this and, generally speaking, we're just beginning to appreciate how right he was. Here are a few tips that can make all the difference to how you feel over the holidays.

  • Take a good quality probiotic daily to keep your microbiome healthy. The gut is home to about 100 trillion microorganisms, most of which are friendly or neutral. Your daily probiotic helps maintain the right balance, and keep you healthy.
  • Eat fermented foods. Some good examples include sauerkraut, other fermented vegetables, yogurt, kefir (fermented milk), natto (fermented soy) and kombucha (fermented tea).
  • Feed the good bacteria in your gut by eating foods containing prebiotics, such as foods containing inulin, e.g. bananas, asparagus, and garlic. Any fruit or vegetable will boost your fibre consumption and support the good bacteria in your gut.
  • Take digestive enzymes, ideally daily, but especially if you are planning on eating a large meal.
  • Be sure you eat plenty of high fibre foods, and possibly also take a fibre supplement, such as psyllium.
  • Be sure to stay well hydrated - drink lots of water. The formula: divide your weight in pounds by 2 - that is the number of ounces of water you should drink per day, to a maximum of 100 ounces. This is a good guide, but it also depends on the weather, how much you sweat, how much exercise you get and how much liquid you ingest from foods, e.g. fruits and vegetables.
  • Slow down! Don't hurry when you eat or drink. Chew your food well. Your digestive system will thank you. Plus you will be less likely to overeat because your stomach will be able to signal your brain that you're full.
  • Choose your indulgences wisely. Pick items that are only available at this time of year; don't waste calories on food you can have any time.  
  • Keep healthy snacks at the office, so you're not tempted by all the treats others bring. Snack on fibre, so you feel fuller.
  • Bring a favourite dish to the party. This way you can easily avoid any food sensitivities, and anything you know will upset your digestion.
  • Lower your stress levels by:
  • consistently getting enough good quality sleep;
  • meditating (see our November 2017 newsletter);
  • getting enough exercise to help keep you clear headed. Also, physical activity is associated with greater gut microbial diversity, i.e. a healthier gut.
  • Schedule some "me" time. Big family or other gatherings can be challenging. So plan time to do whatever relaxes you - take a walk, read a good book, just spend a little time recharging.


Here's to starting 2018 with a healthy gut! I hope you find this helpful, and I wish you all the best in the New Year!

 

References

Disclaimer: The suggestions and recommendations in this newsletter are not intended to be prescriptive or diagnostic. The information is accurate and up to date to our knowledge, but we are not responsible for any errors in our sources of information.

Supplements

There are some Nature's Sunshine supplements that are relevant to this newsletter. You can find information about these products and purchase them in our online store:

  • Fibre Boost
  • Psyllium
  • Digestive enzymes
  • Passion Flower
  • Lavender, Organic Essential Oil
  • Melatonin Extra
  • Zerenity
Passion Flower

For additional information, please email info@ramilas.com or call Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic at 613.829.0427 for an appointment. Please continue letting friends and family know about this newsletter. Also, on our website, please see back issues of this newsletter, information about services, products and our clinic, and order products.

MENTAL STRESS AND INFLAMMATION – OCTOBER 2017 – VOLUME 9, ISSUE 7

 
 

Volume 9, Issue 7

Mental Stress and Inflammation

Now that we are settled into our busy routines after summer holidays, it's a good time to look at the effects of mental stress on our health, and in particular on inflammation, which, in turn, can cause any number of other forms of ill health. Rest assured, we will also look at how you can alleviate this stress! Read on below...

These newsletters will help you make better choices for better health. The choices that you make today can either have a positive or negative impact on your overall health. Begin by choosing better as it is a step toward longevity.

Ramila Padiachy

Doctor of Natural Medicine (DNM)®

Ramila
 

Mental stress as a cause of inflammation

Most people have come to understand that chronic inflammation is a major underlying cause of most chronic disease. But what causes the inflammation? Of course, poor nutrition, lack of exercise, and lack of sleep contribute to inflammation, too, but I want to focus on mental stress because it is an extremely important cause of inflammation we may tend to underestimate or even overlook.

First, it's important to make the distinction between acute and chronic mental stress. Acute stress results from specific events or situations and is short term, for example, an argument with your spouse, or an unkind criticism from your boss. However, chronic stress results if stressful events occur repeatedly, for example, your boss is always criticizing you or you are in a bad relationship.

Acute stress is not necessarily bad for us. The fight-flight-freeze response is designed to handle acute stress. Cortisol (among other substances) is released which immediately increases energy and, in the case of a 'real' emergency, this can be lifesaving, e.g. running away from a dangerous situation. It's when stressors become chronic that we have a problem, often because we feel we have little or no control over the situation. Also, many of these chronic stressors may be more of an annoyance than a real threat to us, e.g. spending time every day in traffic jams, but the body responds as if the threat is real.

Common chronic mental stressors include:

  • ongoing work pressure
  • long-term relationship problems
  • loneliness
  • persistent financial worries
  • any combination of these and/or other chronic mental stressors, e.g. a high pressure job plus ongoing relationship problems

Research has shown that dwelling on negative experiences increases inflammation in the body due to elevated levels of C-reactive protein. Inflammation is the immune system's response to outside dangers and shows that the body is working to repair any damage. However, chronic inflammation has been linked to many health problems, including depression, heart disease, cancer, autoimmune diseases (such as multiple sclerosis) and diabetes.

 

How can I reduce chronic mental stress?

You will likely find a combination of strategies more effective than a single approach. What works for one person does not necessarily work for someone else. So you need to be prepared to try different methods to see what combination works best for you.

First, a healthy lifestyle is essential. You can make yourself more stress-resistant by getting regular exercise, eating a healthy diet (eat lots of vegetables, fruits, adequate water; skip the processed foods, refined carbohydrates including added sugars, excessive caffeine and alcohol), and get enough good quality sleep.

Counselling may help you reduce your reaction to mental stressors. For example, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is an effective way to reduce stress. It typically includes identifying sources of stress, restructuring priorities, changing one's response to stress, and finding methods for managing and reducing stress.

Relaxation and other alternative techniques include:

Deep breathing exercises: During stress, breathing becomes shallow and rapid. Taking deep breaths is an effective way to calm yourself or maintain a relaxed state.

Muscle relaxation: Muscle relaxation techniques, often combined with deep breathing, are easy to learn and very useful for getting to sleep. You can start either from the top of the body or the bottom, tensing each muscle as much as you can for 5-10 seconds, then releasing it completely. 

Meditation: The goal of meditation is simply to quiet the mind. This may take some practice, but you can start by simply observing your thoughts. It is not necessary to meditate for hours at a time; 15-20 minutes is enough. There are many apps and guided meditations available. You can look at a number of them to see what works best for you. In our November 2017 newsletter, we will take a closer look at meditation - stay tuned!

Listen to music: It is an effective stress reducer, and research shows that listening to soothing music can decrease blood pressure, heart rate and anxiety levels.

Herbal and natural remedies: I recommend a few Nature's Sunshine products - please see below. While there are many products available, you want to be sure they are of excellent quality; otherwise, consuming these products could have unintended and undesirable effects. Of course, it is important to follow the instructions; taking more of a product will not necessarily produce a better result. In fact, the opposite is more likely.

You can find more information on relaxation techniques in my book, The Belly of the Beast, soon to be released.

 

References

  1. Stress. An in-depth report on the causes, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of stress. University of Maryland Medical Center. umm.edu/health/medical/reports/articles/stress Accessed September 15, 2017.
  2. Chronic stress changes immune cell genes, leading to inflammation: study. Healthy Living 11/07/2013 huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/07/chronic-stress-health-inflammation-genes_n_4226420.html Accessed September 14, 2017.
  3. Krans B. Dwelling on stressful events increases inflammation in the body. Healthline News, March 18, 2013, healthline.com/health-news/mental-dwelling-on-stressful-events-increases-inflammation-031813#1 Accessed September 14, 2017.

Disclaimer: The suggestions and recommendations in this newsletter are not intended to be prescriptive or diagnostic. The information is accurate and up to date to our knowledge, but we are not responsible for any errors in our sources of information.

Supplements

There are some Nature's Sunshine supplements that are relevant to this newsletter. You can find information about these products and purchase them in our online store:

  • Stress Formula
  • RE-X
  • Passion Flower
  • Lavender, Organic Essential Oil
  • Melatonin Extra
  • STR-J
  • Stress Pak
  • Zerenity

“Have you ever been to a funhouse and looked at yourself in the mirror only to see someone you did not recognize? That is how I saw myself for many years until I went to Ramila for emotional release therapy. I had been battling an eating/ body image disorder for many, many years and after having my daughter I didn’t want her to go through what I was going through. Just one session with Ramila and over the next couple of days I started seeing a new person in the mirror. The REAL me, not the one I had seen for so many years. It was quite the eye-opener."

-Patricia R., Ottawa

For additional information, please email info@ramilas.com or call Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic at 613.829.0427 for an appointment. Please continue letting friends and family know about this newsletter. Also, on our website, please see back issues of this newsletter, information about services, products and our clinic, and order products.

The Belly of the Beast

COMING SOON!

1437 Woodroffe Avenue

Ottawa ON (map)

Facebook info@ramilas.comWebsite

WHY KEEPING TRACK OF YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE MAKES SENSE – SEPTEMBER 2017 - VOLUME 9, ISSUE 6

 
 

Volume 9, Issue 6

Why Keeping Track of Your Blood Pressure Makes Sense

Last month, we discussed metabolic syndrome, and one of its major components is high blood pressure or hypertension. This month, we look at hypertension in more detail, since it is very common. Because it's mostly symptom-free, it is important to understand how important it is to keep track of your blood pressure so that you can take action to lower it if necessary. Read on below...

These newsletters will help you make better choices for better health. The choices that you make today can either have a positive or negative impact on your overall health. Begin by choosing better as it is a step toward longevity.

Ramila Padiachy

Doctor of Natural Medicine (DNM)®

Ramila
 

What is high blood pressure?

Blood pressure is a measurement of the force against the walls of your arteries as your heart pumps blood through your body. Hypertension is another term for high blood pressure. 

  • Systolic pressure is the blood pressure when the heart beats or pumps the blood
  • Diastolic pressure is the blood pressure when the heart is at rest between beats.

A blood pressure reading of 120/80 mmHg is read as '120 over 80 milligrams of mercury' (or just 120 over 80).

Normal blood pressure is defined as under 120/80 mmHg. However, it should be at least 90/60; lower than that is defined as hypotension (low blood pressure).

Prehypertension is defined as systolic blood pressure of 120 - 139 and/or diastolic blood pressure of 80 - 89 mmHg.

High blood pressure stage 1 is defined as systolic blood pressure of 140 - 159 and/or diastolic blood pressure of 90 - 99.

High blood pressure stage 2 is defined as systolic blood pressure of 160 or higher and/or diastolic blood pressure of 100 or more.

 

What are the dangers of high blood pressure?

Excessive pressure on your artery walls caused by high blood pressure can damage your blood vessels, as well as organs in your body. The higher your blood pressure is, and the longer it stays high, the more likely you are to suffer ill effects.

Uncontrolled high blood pressure can lead to:

  • Heart attack or stroke - High blood pressure can cause hardening and thickening of the arteries (atherosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack, stroke or other complications.
  • Aneurysm - Increased blood pressure can cause blood vessels to weaken and bulge, forming an aneurysm. If an aneurysm ruptures, it can be life-threatening.
  • Heart failure - To pump blood against the higher pressure in your blood vessels, your heart muscle thickens. Eventually, the thickened muscle may have difficulty pumping enough blood to meet your body's needs, which can lead to heart failure.
  • Weakened and narrowed blood vessels in your kidneys can prevent them from functioning normally.
  • Metabolic syndrome - High blood pressure is one of the disorders that is part of metabolic syndrome. See our newsletter of August 2017 for more detail.
  • Peripheral artery disease - High blood pressure can involve the build-up of plaque in leg arteries, and can affect the flow of blood in the legs. The most common symptoms are pain, cramping, numbness, aching, or heaviness in the legs, feet and buttocks, especially after walking or climbing stairs.
  • Trouble with memory and understanding - Uncontrolled blood pressure can affect your ability to think, remember and learn.

High blood pressure is known as 'the silent killer' because it is mostly symptom-free. Very high blood pressure, known as malignant hypertension, is very dangerous, and symptoms can include:

  • severe headache
  • nausea or vomiting
  • confusion
  • vision changes
  • nosebleeds

Who is more likely to develop high blood pressure?

While the causes of high blood pressure are not precisely known, there are a number of risk factors for it, including:

  • smoking
  • being overweight or obese
  • stress and anxiety
  • lack of physical activity
  • too much processed salt in the diet
  • added sugars - cutting processed foods from your diet may help not only by reducing refined salt but also by reducing sugar
  • too little potassium in your diet
  • too little vitamin D
  • too much alcohol consumption (more than 1 to 2 drinks per day)
  • older age
  • genetics
  • family history of high blood pressure
  • chronic kidney disease
  • adrenal and thyroid disorders
  • sleep apnea
  • some medicines, such as asthma or hormone therapies, including birth control pills and estrogen, as well as over-the-counter medicines, e.g. for the relief of colds
 

How can I prevent or manage high blood pressure?

Many risk factors for high blood pressure are modifiable. There's a lot you can do to help control your blood pressure yourself, including:

  • Eat a heart-healthy diet, including potassium and fibre. As always, it's important to eat lots of vegetables, as well as legumes and fruit, and limit added sugars. Garlic helps to lower blood pressure.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Get at least 30 minutes of aerobic exercise a day.
  • Manage stress effectively. Meditation and yoga are excellent ways to reduce stress; physical activity also reduces stress levels.
  • Maintain a healthy body weight - a healthy BMI (Body Mass Index) is between 18.5 and 24.9.
  • If you smoke, quit.
  • Limit the amount of alcohol you drink to 2 drinks a day for men and 1 for women.
  • Use Himalayan salt or sea salt in moderation. Avoid processed foods with the typically excessive amounts of processed salt.
  • Optimize your vitamin D levels. Vitamin D deficiency is linked to stiff arteries.
  • Optimize your omega 6:3 ratio. Most North Americans get too much omega 6 and too little omega-3. While we need both, too much omega-6 causes inflammation. Omega-6 fats are found in corn, soy, canola, safflower, and sunflower oil - they should be consumed in limited quantities. The best source of omega-3 is a safe source of fish, or krill oil.
  • Take CoQ10 (coenzyme Q10).
  • Optimize your gut flora. Consuming probiotics has been shown to help lower blood pressure. The best way to optimize your gut flora is to avoid sugar and processed foods. Fermented foods like kefir, kombucha and fermented vegetables are very helpful.
  • Maintain an optimal sodium-potassium ratio.
  • Vitamins C and E may help to lower blood pressure.

If you have done all you can to control your blood pressure, but are still experiencing problems, please seek medical help. I would be glad to see you and recommend supplements. Please call 613.829.0429 for an appointment.

 

References

  1. High blood pressure. New York Times, Monday, July 24, 2017, nytimes.com/health/guides/disease/hypertension/overview.html Accessed July 31, 2017.
  2. Description of high blood pressure. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/hbp Accessed July 24, 2017.
  3. Hypotension. Wikipedia en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypotension Accessed July 31, 2017.
  4. High blood pressure (hypertension). Mayo Clinic mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/basics/definition/con-20019580 Accessed July 31, 2017.
  5. Mercola J. Study suggests sugar is worse than salt for blood pressure. articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/02/25/sugar-blood-pressure.aspx Accessed July 24, 2017.
  6. Axe J. 5 natural ways to lower blood pressure. draxe.com/natural-ways-to-lower-blood-pressure/ Accessed July 24, 2017.

Disclaimer: The suggestions and recommendations in this newsletter are not intended to be prescriptive or diagnostic. The information is accurate and up to date to our knowledge, but we are not responsible for any errors in our sources of information.

Supplements

There are some Nature's Sunshine supplements that are relevant to this newsletter. You can find information about these products and purchase them in our online store:

  • Blood pressurex
  • CardioxLDL
  • CoQ10
  • Garlic, High Potency
  • Grapine
  • Hawthorn
  • Passionflower
  • Super Omega-3
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin D3
  • Vitamin E with Selenium
  • Zerenity

New! BioFlex Laser Therapy

Laser therapy, also known as low-level laser or light therapy, is a treatment that uses specific types of light to interact with tissue. It is used to eliminate pain and promote healing.

Laser therapy offers patients a safe and effective therapy for a wide range of medical conditions, including soft tissue and sports injuries, arthritic conditions, repetitive stress injuries, wound healing, and a variety of general health problems.

For additional information, please email info@ramilas.com or call Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic at 613.829.0427 for an appointment. Please continue letting friends and family know about this newsletter. Also, on our website, please see back issues of this newsletter, information about services, products and our clinic, and order products.

The Belly of the Beast

COMING SOON!

1437 Woodroffe Avenue

Ottawa ON (map)

Facebook info@ramilas.comWebsite

WHAT IS METABOLIC SYNDROME? - AUGUST 2017 - VOLUME 9, ISSUE 5

 

Ramilas Health Tips

Ramila's Healing Arts Clinic

 

I hope you're continuing to enjoy a fun and relaxing summer! This month I would like to draw your attention to a disorder that was only identified less than 20 years ago. In spite of this, it affects about 40% of the population aged 60 and over. It is called metabolic syndrome. As the obesity epidemic increases, younger people, even children, are increasingly affected, as well. Read on below...

 
These newsletters will help you make better choices for better health. The choices that you make today can either have a positive or negative impact on your overall health. Begin by choosing better, it is a step toward longevity.

clinic

We now offer Physiotherapy Services and Laser Rehabilitation

Clinically proven to eliminate pain!

Volume 9, Issue 5

Ramila Padiachy

Doctor of Natural Medicine (DNM)®

Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic

1437 Woodroffe Avenue
Ottawa ON (map)

613.829.0427
info@ramilas.com

Like us on Facebook

What is Metabolic Syndrome?

If you have metabolic syndrome, it does not simply mean that your metabolism is out of whack. Metabolic syndrome (sometimes referred to as syndrome X) is a metabolic disorder defined as a combination of 3 or more of the following health issues:

  • abdominal obesity (a large waistline, 35 inches for women, 40 inches for men; 'apple' shape)
  • high fasting blood sugar
  • high triglyceride levels (a type of fat found in the blood)
  • high blood pressure
  • low HDL ('good') cholesterol

Metabolic syndrome is not a disease. It is a group of risk factors - risk factors for some major diseases that affect a large number of people, namely heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetesOther risk factors for metabolic syndrome include:

  • age
  • physical inactivity
  • a poor diet, e.g. processed foods, high amounts of sugar and other refined carbohydrates, trans fat, diet soft drinks
  • low-grade inflammation throughout the body
  • a fatty liver (non-alcoholic fatter liver disease or NAFLD)
  • polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) - see our March 2017 newsletter
  • gallstones
  • breathing problems during sleep, such as sleep apnea
  • heavy alcohol consumption (However, very light alcohol intake is actually associated with a reduced risk of metabolic syndrome. This means no more than 2 drinks per day for men, and 1 for women. One drink is 12oz of beer, 5oz of wine or 1.5oz of liquor.)

 

Prevention and Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome

Prevention


physical activityThe best preventive strategies for metabolic syndrome are:

  • maintain a healthy weight
  • be physically active
  • eat a healthy diet (see below for details)
  • manage stress effectively
  • don't smoke

 

Treatment


Heart-healthy lifestyle changes are typically the main treatment for metabolic syndrome.

 

In other words, do as recommended for prevention of metabolic syndrome above, and you will, to a large extent, treat it. Let's look in more detail at how you might accomplish this.

 

Maintain a healthy weight


Through eating a healthy diet and exercising, losing weight can reduce insulin resistance and blood pressure. Foods that make metabolic syndrome worse:

  • Avoid processed foods (including fast food) as much as possible; they are typically filled with additives and preservatives that are bad for your health.
  • Artificial sweeteners, including aspartame, Splenda, sucralose and saccharin may increase your risk of excessive weight gain, as well as the development of metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Avoid diet soft drinks!
  • Trans fats are found in food made with hydrogenated oils and fats, such as margarine and shortening, and in baked goods (cookies, cakes, pies, coffee creamers). They raise LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels, which are bad for your waistline, heart health and metabolic disorders.
  • Sugar and other refined carbohydrates are major contributors to high blood sugar levels, insulin resistance, the development of metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes.
  • Limit alcohol consumption; as noted above, light alcohol consumption is not a risk factor for metabolic syndrome, however, heavier consumption is.

Food that help prevent and treat metabolic syndrome:

  • Fish and other foods with omega-3 fatty acids: The omega-3 found in wild-caught, cold water fish helps to regulate heartbeat, reduce blood pressure, decrease blood clot formation, and reduce overall inflammation. This decreases the risk of heart attacks and strokes. Omega-3 foods also help to lower LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. Other foods rich in omega-3 include walnuts, flaxseeds, natto and grass-fed beef.
  • Vegetables: Dark leafy greens (e.g. kale, spinach), avocado, broccoli, cabbage, different colours of bell peppers, squash, eggplant, arugula and carrots are a few of the healthy options for increasing your daily intake of vegetables which are loaded with disease-fighting anti-inflammatory antioxidants and phytonutrients. Avocados have been clinically associated with lower risk of metabolic syndrome in the U.S.; it is believed this is because avocados benefit the gut.
  • Fruits: In moderation (because of the natural sugar), daily fruit consumption helps to ward off metabolic syndrome. In particular, pomegranate and pomegranate seeds have been shown to help ameliorate metabolic syndrome.
  • Legumes, such as kidney beans, lentils, chickpeas, black-eyed peas and lima beans are rich in fibre and protein. They help to keep blood sugar stable, and have been shown to reduce the risk of metabolic syndrome.
  • Whole grains, like oatmeal and brown rice, are high in fibre, have proven benefits for diabetes and heart health, and help keep your waistline in check.

 

Physical activity


Regular, moderate intensity physical activity, such as walking briskly, will help control your weight. At least 30 minutes per day is recommended; however, you can start more gradually if you need to and work up to that.

 

The good news is you can prevent or reduce your risk of metabolic syndrome with healthy lifestyle choices. However, if you would like help maintaining a healthy weight, or with any other aspect of metabolic syndrome, please contact me at 613.829.0427. I'll be more than happy to help you.

 

Supplements

There are some Nature's Sunshine supplements that are relevant to this newsletter. You can find information about these products and purchase them in our online store:

 

Berberine
Blood pressurex
CardioxLDL
CoQ10
Garlic, High Potency
Grapine
GreenZone
Hawthorn
Super Omega-3
Vitamin D3
Zambroza

For additional information, email info@ramilas.com or call Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic at 613.829.0427 for an appointment. Please continue letting friends and family know about this newsletter. Visit our website where you can see back issues of this newsletter, information about services and our clinic, and order products.

 

References:

 

  1. What is metabolic syndrome? webmd.com/heart/metabolic-syndrome/metabolic-syndrome-what-is-it#1 Accessed July 17, 2017.
  2. Axe J. Metabolic syndrome: proven diet & natural treatment plan. draxe.com/metabolic-syndrome/ Accessed July 17, 2017.
  3. What is metabolic syndrome? nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/ms Accessed July 17, 2017.
  4. Abdominal fat and what to do about it. Harvard Health Publications, September, 2005, updated October 9, 2015 health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/abdominal-fat-and-what-to-do-about-it Accessed July 17, 2017.

Disclaimer: The suggestions and recommendations in this newsletter are not intended to be prescriptive or diagnostic. The information is accurate and up to date to our knowledge, but we are not responsible for any errors in our sources of information.

 

When health begins, dis-ease ends.

  

 

Stay Tuned!! I am so excited that The BELLY OF THE BEAST is in the final stages of publishing.

THE TELOMERE EFFECT - JULY 2017 - VOLUME 9, ISSUE 4

 

Ramilas Health Tips

Ramila's Healing Arts Clinic

 

I hope you're enjoying a fun and relaxing summer! This is a great time of year to take a break, and generally take things a little easier and reduce our stress levels. I'd like to give you an idea of how important this, and other healthy behaviours are for slowing down the rate at which we age. Read on below...

 
These newsletters will help you make better choices for better health. The choices that you make today can either have a positive or negative impact on your overall health. Begin by choosing better. It is a step toward longevity.

clinic

Volume 9, Issue 4

Ramila Padiachy

Doctor of Natural Medicine (DNM)®

Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic

1437 Woodroffe Avenue
Ottawa ON (map)

613.829.0427
info@ramilas.com

Like us on Facebook

What's a Telomere?

You may have heard or read about telomeres. Briefly, each chromosome (containing DNA) has a sort of cap on each end - these caps are telomeres. As cells repeatedly divide over a person's lifetime, as a general rule, the telomeres become shorter. The length of our telomeres can tell us a lot about how well we're aging.

 

In January 2017, Elizabeth Blackburn and Elissa Epel published a book, The Telomere Effect: A Revolutionary Approach to Living Younger, Healthier, Longer. This book makes Nobel Prize winning research conducted by Elizabeth Blackburn and others available beyond academia, to a more general audience.

 

The Telomere Effect

Our lifestyle choices affect our telomeres and how we age. And it's possible to measure telomere length to get some indication of how we're doing.

 

As I mentioned, the chromosomes in each of our cells contain our DNA. At the ends of each chromosome are telomeres, which have been described as being like the caps on the ends of shoelaces, that keep the shoelaces/chromosomes from unravelling.

 

Each time a cell divides, the telomeres become a little bit shorter, until they become too short to protect the chromosome. At this point the cell has aged, and cannot properly do its job any more. Having too many of these senescent cells accelerates aging. This doesn't cause any specific disease, but it is believed you'll be more likely to develop any disease you might be prone to.

 

How can we affect the rate at which we age? Blackburn was part of a team that won the Nobel Prize in Physiology in 2009 for discovering the role of an enzyme - telomerase - that can help lengthen your telomeres. Blackburn and Epel make the case that telomeres are just one pathway of aging, and that certain aspects of your lifestyle may stabilize or even increase telomere length and help slow down or prevent aging.

 

peacefulnessFactors that help protect your telomeres include:

  • a healthy diet - The Mediterranean diet is associated with longer telomeres. Adequate nutrition including antioxidants, in general, and specifically vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids are also important.
  • being physically active - A small study found 45 minutes of moderate exercise, three times a week for six months increased telomerase activity twofold.
  • adequate, good quality sleep - A 2012 study found that sleeping fewer hours was associated with shorter telomere length in healthy men.
  • avoiding (or managing) chronic stress
  • meditation
  • mental well-being
  • social support
  • level of trust and safety in your neighbourhood

Conversely, factors that promote cellular aging and shortening of telomeres include:

  • stress hormones
  • oxidative stress
  • inflammatory stress

Note that no long term studies have been done, so we don't know what effect maintaining telomere length has on longevity. At this point we are looking at associations, not cause and effect. However, a longer 'health span' (and reduced 'disease span') is likely to be the outcome of maintaining longer telomeres.

 

Too much as bad as too little? Too little telomerase resulting in shorter telomeres can increase the risk of cancer because mutations can occur when the cells don't replicate properly. However, too much telomerase can help confer immortality onto cancer cells and increase the likelihood of cancer. Telomerase has been found to be 10 to 20 times more active in cancer cells than in normal body cells. It is believed that if this telomerase activity could be turned off, then telomeres in cancer cells would shorten (as they do in normal cells) and this would prevent the cancer cells from dividing uncontrollably in their early stages of development, or prevent relapse after the removal of a more advanced tumour. This could be a promising avenue for better cancer treatment. It is also clear that healthy lifestyle choices are better than taking telomerase as a medication - we wouldn't know if we were increasing the length of the telomeres of good cells or cancer cells.

 

Haven't I already heard these recommendations for improving my health? Yes, absolutely. However, now there is a way to document how well we're doing, by measuring the length of our telomeres. Telomere length can change in both directions - you may have longer telomeres one year, and shorter ones the next year - so Dr. Blackburn does not actually recommend getting your telomeres tested, but it's possible.

 

According to S. Jay Olshansky, PhD, of the University of Illinois, Chicago, "The only equivalent of a fountain of youth that exists is exercise and diet and avoiding harmful behaviour and risk factors like smoking and obesity. If you are doing this, you are doing as much as you can to allow your genetic potential to play out."

 

Supplements

There are some Nature's Sunshine supplements that are relevant to this newsletter.

 

You can find information about these products and purchase them in our online store:

 

Super Omega 3
Super Vitamins & Minerals
Vitamin D3
Vitamin E with Selenium
Vitamin C 1000 mg
Vitamin B Complex
Zambroza
 

 

For additional information, email info@ramilas.com or call Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic at 613.829.0427 for an appointment. Please continue letting friends and family know about this newsletter. Visit our website where you can see back issues of this newsletter, information about services and our clinic, and order products.

 

References:

 

  1. Blackburn E, Epel E. The Telomere Effect: A Revolutionary Approach to Living Younger, Healthier, Longer. New York: Grand Central Publishing, Hachette Book Group, 2017.
  2. Clopton J. What tiny telomeres may tell us about aging. WebMD Health News, April 19, 2017. webmd.com/special-reports/anti-aging-science/20170419/telomere-aging-link Accessed May 30, 2017.
  3. Rehman J. Aging: too much telomerase can be as bad as too little. July 5, 2014 blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/aging-too-much-telomerase-can-be-as-bad-as-too-little/ Accessed May 30, 2017.
  4. Greider CW, Blackburn EH. Telomeres, telomerase and Cancer [Reprint]. October 5, 2009 scientificamerican.com/article/telomeres-telomerase-and/ Accessed May 30, 2017.
  5. Facts about telomeres and telomerase. utsouthwestern.edu/labs/shay-wright/research/facts-about-telomeres-telomerase.html Accessed May 30, 2017.
  6. Corbyn Z. Elizabeth Blackburn on the telomere effect: 'It's abut keeping healthier for longer.' January 29, 2017 theguardian.com/science/2017/jan/29/telomere-effect-elizabeth-blackburn-nobel-prize-medicine-chromosomes Accessed May 30, 2017.

 

Disclaimer: The suggestions and recommendations in this newsletter are not intended to be prescriptive or diagnostic. The information is accurate and up to date to our knowledge, but we are not responsible for any errors in our sources of information.

 

When health begins, dis-ease ends.

“I had my first visit to a holistic clinic for a very bad sinus infection and I am so pleased I went to see Ramila. After 2 weeks of congestion, followed by 3 days of complete blockage and body aches, I was 90% better in 48 hours. My respiratory health was fully restored in just 4 days, with no recurrence of symptoms. I am amazed with the results and although I maintain my health through proper nutrition and exercise, it's comforting to know I can count on Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic for natural treatments. Thank you.”

— Valarie L

 

WHY VITAMIN D IS IMPORTANT TO YOUR HEALTH - NOVEMBER 2016 - VOLUME 8, ISSUE 8

 

 

Ramilas Health Tips

Ramila's Healing Arts Clinic

 

The news about vitamin D keeps getting better and better. Since the Canadian climate does not provide enough vitamin D from sunlight during the late fall and winter months, supplementation is particularly important, and also inexpensive. I'm sure you know vitamin D is extremely important to your health, but you may not be aware of some of its benefits. We reviewed some of them in our October 2013 and October 2010 newsletters, but there are some important updates. Note that we are using 'vitamin D' to mean D3 (and not D2). Read on below...
 
These newsletters will help you make better choices for better health. The choices that you make today can either have a positive or negative impact on your overall health. Begin by choosing better. It is a step toward longevity.

Volume 8, Issue 8

Ramila Padiachy

Doctorate of Natural Medicine (DNM)®

Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic

1437 Woodroffe Avenue
Ottawa ON (map)

613.829.0427
info@ramilas.com

Why Vitamin D is Important to Your Health

The Vitamin D Council summarizes the benefits of vitamin D as follows:
"Vitamin D is important for good overall health and strong and healthy bones. It's also an important factor in making sure your muscles, heart, lungs and brain work well and that your body can fight infection."

 

sunshineUnlike other vitamins, vitamin D does not depend on the foods you eat, but on your exposure to the sunshine (or vitamin D supplements). Exposure to the sun enables the body to make its vitamin D. The body then turns vitamin D into a hormone, known as 'activated vitamin D' or calcitriol. Vitamin D has an important role in managing calcium in your blood; it enables calcium to be properly absorbed. It also helps cells all over the body to communicate properly.

 

To briefly review the benefits of vitamin D that we've already discussed in the October 2013 newsletter, vitamin D

  • lowers the risk of several types of cancer
  • improves lung function
  • helps build strong bones and teeth
  • contributes to good cardiovascular health
  • helps our immune system
  • combats aging
  • protects against multiple sclerosis
  • helps reduce insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes
  • reduces the risk of Parkinson's disease
  • helps prevent disability and limitations in activities of daily living

This is already a very impressive list, but new research is adding to this all the time. The following is just a partial account of some of the most recent knowledge of the benefits of vitamin D.

 

While the evidence is preliminary, there is increasing research examining a link between vitamin D and Alzheimer's Disease.

  • There are receptors for vitamin D in many parts of the brain. This means vitamin D is acting in some way on the brain and influencing how a person thinks, learns and acts. It has been found that, in people with Alzheimer's disease, there are fewer receptors in the hippocampus which is involved in forming memories, or in other words, a greater number of vitamin D receptors indicates better memory.
  • Of course, prevention of Alzheimer's disease is extremely important. So far, researchers can't say for sure that getting enough vitamin D will prevent Alzheimer's disease, but since low levels of vitamin D are associated with poorer cognitive performance, this seems to hold promise.

Vitamin D may help reduce pain.

  • A meta-analysis of 19 randomized clinical trials and 3,436 participants is the first to quantify the effect of vitamin D supplementation on pain. Sixteen of the 19 RCTs included in the analysis were hospital-based; the remaining 3 were community-based.
  • A significantly greater mean decrease in pain score was observed with vitamin D supplementation compared with placebo in people with chronic pain.
  • This suggests that vitamin D could have a role in the management of chronic pain. Further study is needed to confirm these findings.

Vitamin D may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer, which is one of the most common forms of cancer. Research tells us that:

  • People with low levels of vitamin D in their body are more likely to develop colorectal cancer.
  • Regions, where people are exposed to the lowest amount of sunlight, have higher rates of colorectal cancer than people in sunny places.
  • Studies have found a dose-response relationship, where for each increase in vitamin D level in the body, there is a decrease in colorectal cancer risk.
  • High levels of vitamin D in the body may improve survival from colorectal cancer.
  • Most studies of vitamin D and colorectal cancer have been observational, which means that researchers can't be sure whether vitamin D causes the observed reduction in risk, or whether it's due to some other factor.
  • Again, more study is needed to clarify the strength of this association.

Influenza and Vitamin D:

  • People who get influenza are more likely to have low levels of vitamin D.
  • Vitamin D can help reduce inflammation caused by the influenza virus and increase the number of antimicrobial proteins that fight against viruses.
  • Influenza infections increase during the winter, which is when vitamin D levels are known to decrease in the population.
  • Some studies have shown that taking vitamin D supplements can reduce the chances of getting influenza; however, others have not shown this.
  • Having high levels of vitamin D may help decrease recovery time from an influenza infection.

 

What level of vitamin D supplementation is appropriate?

There is no single answer to this question. It depends on how much sun you get, your skin colour (darker skin absorbs less), your age (adults need more than children or infants), your weight (the more you weigh, the more vitamin D your body can handle), and whether it's winter, summer or somewhere in between. Supplementation is necessary during the winter months in Canada! Check this reference for more detail.

 

While different organizations define various levels of vitamin D supplementation as appropriate, it seems more than 10,000 IU (International Units) of vitamin D per day is excessive.

 

How much sun do I need?


It takes very little summer sun exposure, particularly if you're fair skinned, to get enough vitamin D from the sun - about half the time it takes for your skin to turn pink and begin to burn. This could be only 15 minutes for a very fair skinned person, or a couple of hours or more for a dark skinned person. This guideline will lead to the body producing from 10,000 to 25,000 IU. Note: higher amounts are not a problem when vitamin D is generated by the sun, as opposed to obtained from supplements.

 

I hope vitamin D helps you have a healthy winter season!

 

Supplements

vitamin D3There are some Nature's Sunshine supplements that are relevant to this newsletter.

 

You can find information about these products and purchase them in our online store:

  • Super Vitamins & Minerals
  • Vitamin D3
  • Liquid Vitamin D (available from our office only)

For additional information, please email info@ramilas.com or call Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic at 613.829.0427 for an appointment. Please continue letting friends and family know about this newsletter. Visit our website where you can see back issues of this newsletter, information about services, products, and our clinic, and order products.

 

References:

  1. What is vitamin D? The Vitamin D Council. vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/what-is-vitamin-d/ Accessed October 24, 2016.
  2. Alzheimer's Disease. The Vitamin D Council. vitamindcouncil.org/health-conditions/alzheimers-disease/ Updated November 30, 2015.
  3. Balion C, Griffith LE, Strifler L, et al. Vitamin D, cognition, and dementia. Neurology 2012;79:1397-1405.
  4. Can vitamin D-crease pain? examine.com/nutrition/can-vitamin-d-crease-pain Accessed November 10, 2016.
  5. Wu Z, Malihi Z, Stewart AW et al. Effect of vitamin D supplementation on pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Pain Physician 2016;19:425-427.
  6. Colorectal cancer. The Vitamin D Council. vitamindcouncil.org/health-conditions/colorectal-cancer/ Last updated January 2014.
  7. Influenza. The Vitamin D Council. vitamindcouncil.org/health-conditions/influenza/ Updated December 2015.
  8. How do I get the vitamin D my body needs? The Vitamin D Council. vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/how-do-i-get-the-vitamin-d-my-body-needs/ Accessed November 14, 2016.

Disclaimer: The suggestions and recommendations in this newsletter are not intended to be prescriptive or diagnostic. The information is accurate and up to date to our knowledge, but we are not responsible for any errors in our sources of information.

"Will I ever be able to dance at my niece’s wedding?" I asked myself. My feet are cramping and I cannot stand to wear shoes. I happened to have an appointment with Ramila and Megs on the day before the wedding. It seems I had been sensitive to magnesium all along. One desensitization treatment and voila! I was able to dance the evening away!

- Johanne, Ottawa

When health begins, dis-ease ends.

HOW TO FIGHT PARASITIC DISEASES – JUNE 2016 – VOLUME 8 ISSUE 3

 

 

Ramilas Health Tips

Ramila's Healing Arts Clinic

 

Living in Canada, we may be inclined to think that infectious and parasitic diseases are not a major health concern, but we would be wrong! It's estimated that one in three Americans has a parasitic infection and, while the percentage may be lower in Canada, at least partly due to our generally cooler climate, there are still many ways we can come in contact with parasites. So, even though it may not exactly be an appetizing topic, it's a really good idea to know what you might do if ever you find yourself with this problem. Read on below...

 

These newsletters will help you make better choices for better health. The choices that you make today can either have a positive or negative impact on your overall health. Begin by choosing better. It is a step toward longevity.

clinic

Volume 8, Issue 3

Ramila Padiachy

Doctorate of Natural Medicine (DNM)®

Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic

1437 Woodroffe Avenue
Ottawa ON (map)

613.829.0427
info@ramilas.com

Like us on Facebook

How to Fight Parasitic Diseases

Types of parasites
 
There are three main categories of parasites:
  1. Protozoa, including Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum. They are microscopic one-celled organisms that can be free-living or parasitic in nature. They are able to multiply in humans, which contributes to their survival and also permits serious infections to develop from just a single organism.
  2. Helminths are large multicellular organisms that are generally visible to the naked eye as adults. They can also be either free-living or parasitic. The adult form cannot multiply in humans. They include flatworms (platyhelminths), e.g. tapeworms (cestodes); thorny-headed worms (acanthocephalins); and roundworms (nematodes). They generally reside in the gastrointestinal tract, blood, lymphatic system or subcutaneous tissues. However, the immature states (larvae) can infect various body tissues.
  3. Ectoparasites - While the term can broadly include blood-sucking arthropods, such as mosquitoes, it is generally used to refer to organisms like ticks, fleas, lice and mites that attach or burrow into the skin and remain there for relatively long periods of time, e.g. weeks to months. Arthropods are important because they cause disease in their own right, but are even more important as vectors, or transmitters, of many different pathogens that in turn cause a major amount of illness and mortality from the diseases they cause. For example, in this category, world-wide, malaria causes the most deaths.

 

How would I come in contact with a parasite?

  • Water
    In Canada, Giardia and Cryptosporidium can be found in drinking water that has not been filtered. Giardia causes an intestinal illness called giardiasis or "beaver fever". These parasites can also exist in bodies of fresh water, i.e. rivers and lakes.
  • Food
    One source is food imported to Canada from countries where contamination by parasites is more likely; this can include produce. Undercooked meat or raw fish are potential sources of parasitic infections regardless of their place of origin.
  • travelInternational travel
    Travel to countries where parasitic infections are more common can result in bringing them home.
  • Contact with an infected person
    Close contact, e.g. with children in daycare centres, and also sexual contact, can spread parasitic infections.
  • Having a weakened immune system
    Seniors and children are more likely to be infected, as well as anyone with a compromised immune system.

 

Symptoms, Treatment and Avoidance

What are the symptoms of a parasitic infection?
 
The symptoms, and their severity, may differ depending on the parasite, but the most common symptoms include:
  • abdominal pain
  • diarrhea
  • nausea or vomiting
  • gas or bloating
  • dysentery (loose stools containing blood and mucus)
  • rash or itching around the rectum or vulva
  • stomach pain or tenderness
  • feeling tired
  • weight loss
  • passing a worm in your stool (may look like a piece of spaghetti)
Note that in some cases, people are symptom-free.
 
How can parasitic infections be treated?
 
Parasitic infections can be treated with antiparasitic drugs or antibiotics, depending on the parasite. However, re-infection is common, and there is concern about the development of drug resistance. Alternative medicine treatments are also available, and I personally recommend Nature's Sunshine's Para Pak, often in combination with other antiparasitic supplements, such as garlic, digestive enzymes and probiotics (see the section on supplements below). Avoid refined carbohydrates (which feed the parasite) and eat more fibre (which can get rid of worms). If you suspect you have a parasitic infection, please call me for an appointment at 613.829.0427. I can determine the best combination of supplements for your situation.
 
What can I do to avoid infection?
  • drink clean, bottled water when travelling
  • if you are pregnant, avoid cat litter and feces
  • practice safe sex
  • food preparationwash your hands, especially when coming into contact with contaminated food, water and feces
  • cook food to recommended temperatures and practice good hygiene
  • avoid swallowing water in lakes, streams or ponds
  • water stored in glass or stainless steel containers is generally safer than water stored in plastic
  • when you travel, research your destination before you depart to obtain information on outbreaks and preventive measures
It is estimated that the large majority of reported cases of food-borne illness in the United States (and no doubt in Canada, as well) are caused by a lack of hygiene and food-handling errors in the home and commercial kitchen. Thus food-borne illness could be greatly reduced if everyone learned simple, safe food-handling and preparation procedures.
 
I wish you a safe, enjoyable and parasite-free summer!

 

Supplements for Success

Para PakThere are a number of Nature's Sunshine supplements that can help you deal with a parasitic infection. You can find information about these products and purchase them in our online store:

  • Para Pak
  • Silver Guard
  • Garlic, High Potency
  • Black Walnut
  • Protease Plus
  • Acidophilus Bifidobacterium
  • Bifidophilus Flora Force
  • Digestive Enzymes

For additional information, please email info@ramilas.com or call Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic at 613.829.0427 for an appointment. Please continue letting friends and family know about this newsletter. Also, on our website, please see back issues of this newsletter, information about services, products and our clinic, and order products.

References:

  1. Oz M. Parasites: could they be making your sick? doctoroz.com/article/parasites-could-they-be-making-you-sick October 29, 2013.
  2. About parasites. CDC cdc.gov/parasites/about.html March 5, 2014. 
  3. Intestinal parasites. University of Maryland Medical Center. umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/condition/intestinal-parasites Accessed June 2, 2016. 
  4. The problem of parasitic diseases. Centre for Host-Parasite Interactions, McGill University. mcgill.ca/chpi/centre/diseases Accessed June 2, 2016. 
  5. Parasitic disease. Wikipedia. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parasitic_disease Accessed June 2, 2016.
  6. Kinman T. Parasitic infections. May 30, 2013 healthline.com/health/parasitic-infections#Overview1
  7. Preventing parasitic infections. coreonehealth.com/preventing-parasitic-infections Accessed June 13, 2016.

Disclaimer: The suggestions and recommendations in this newsletter are not intended to be prescriptive or diagnostic. The information is accurate and up to date to our knowledge, but we are not responsible for any errors in our sources of information.

Amazing... I'm feel better already!! I've been experiencing adrenal exhaustion, not being able to sleep and daily headache from dehydration, so now taking some herbal supplements, a tonic and vitamins to get my groove back!! Apparently burning the candle at both ends for twelve years will do that to you. After three days I'm already sleeping better and headaches are just about gone. Going back in a couple of weeks to do the emotional cleanse/release and in a month to check my adrenal glands making sure I’m back to 'normal'.
- Tracey S, Ottawa

When health begins, dis-ease ends.

THE POWER OF POSITIVE THINKING – MAY 2016 – VOLUME 8 ISSUE 2

Ramilas Health Tips

Ramila's Healing Arts Clinic

The power of positive thinking gets a lot of attention these days, and I'd like to take a look at it this month. After all, it's easier to be more positive with the longer days and warmer weather at this time of year! However, some balance is necessary. When we go through difficult times, it's a mistake to deny our feelings or problems; we won't solve them by putting on a smile and ignoring them.
 
As a side note, for those who are less than happy, do not despair. A study was published in the Lancet recently which found that happiness had no effect on mortality. Women in the study who reported being happier, did not live longer. While ill health can result in unhappiness (and was controlled for in the analysis), the reverse was not seen in this large study.
 
However, there is evidence that by changing our thoughts and beliefs, we can change ourselves. For example, Joe Dispenza advocates changing your mind to change yourself, and provides convincing evidence that this really works. Read on below...

 

These newsletters will help you make better choices for better health. The choices that you make today can either have a positive or negative impact on your overall health. Begin by choosing better. It is a step toward longevity.

Volume 8, Issue 2

The Power of Positive Thinking

Ramila Padiachy

Doctorate of Natural Medicine (DNM)®

Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic

1437 Woodroffe Avenue
Ottawa ON (map)

613.829.0427
info@ramilas.com

Like us on Facebook

The Power of Positive Thinking

Positive thinking does not mean ignoring anything negative, but rather approaching negative situations with the expectation of a positive outcome. This can be as simple as a valuable lesson learned from the negative experience, or emerging as a stronger person better able to cope with adversity.
 
It's not as simple as just thinking positive thoughts - we need to act in positive ways, too. Studies have shown, for example, that smiling actually produces physical changes in the body so you actually feel happy, even if you didn't to begin with.
 
Also, positive affirmations must be believable to you. Anything that you don't believe will not have the desired effect - it will just make you feel worse.
 
Benefits of a positive mindset
 
When you experience positive emotions, you see more possibilities in your life. You have challenges for which you are able to find solutions, not insurmountable problems with no solution in sight. You develop an enhanced ability to build skills and develop resources for later use.
 
Happy for No Reason by Marci Shimoff is an excellent book. To learn how to be truly happy, she interviewed 100 truly happy people from all walks of life, many of whom had come through very difficult situations - they weren't handed happiness on a silver platter! She outlines 21 habits that happy people share:
  1. Focus on solutions.Happy for No Reason
  2. Look for the lesson and the gift.
  3. Make peace with yourself.
  4. Question your thoughts. Don't believe everything you think.
  5. Go beyond the mind and let go. Free yourself from your negative thoughts and feelings.
  6. Incline your mind toward joy.
  7. Focus on gratitude.
  8. Practice forgiveness.
  9. Spread 'loving kindness'.
  10. Nourish your body.
  11. Energize your body.
  12. Tune in to your body's wisdom.
  13. Invite connection with your higher power.
  14. Listen to your inner voice.
  15. Trust life's unfolding.
  16. Find your passion.
  17. Follow the inspiration of the moment.
  18. Contribute to something greater than yourself.
  19. Tend to your relationships.
  20. Surround yourself with support.
  21. See the world as your family.
This list barely scratches the surface of this book. I highly recommend it.
 

How to Become a More Positive Person

Here are a few tips to help you be more positive:
  • Identify negative thinking so you can stop the negative spiral. Look for:
  1. Filtering. You magnify the negative aspects and filter out the positive aspects of a situation.
  2. Personalizing. When something bad happens, you automatically blame yourself. Don't take anything personally!
  3. Catastrophizing. You automatically anticipate the worst. One small thing goes wrong, and you assume the whole day will be a disaster.
  4. Polarizing. You see things only as good or bad, you're either perfect or a total failure; there is no middle ground.  
  • Start a gratitude journal. Gratitude is very healthy! Every day, preferably in the evening, write down 5 things for which you are grateful for that day. Just thinking about gratitude is less effective than writing. If you write in your gratitude journal every day for 21 days, it will become a habit that will be easy to maintain. It will change your thought patterns; you'll notice many more things to be grateful for.
  • Do something for someone else. This takes your mind off your problems, and gives you a sense of accomplishment.
  • Give back. According to your ability and your interests, support charitable causes.
  • Do something nice for yourself. Treat yourself well every day; you deserve it. Schedule play time.
  • Meditate. Meditation calms the mind, and helps you maintain a more positive outlook. This can be done in as little as 10 minutes a day; it doesn't have to take hours.
  • Try yoga. Like meditation, yoga is calming and can help you enter a meditative state.
  • Surround yourself with positive people. This may be easier said than done, but try following the 80/20 rule, that is, limit your exposure to negative people to 20% of your time, fill the other 80% with positive people.
  • Follow a healthy lifestyle. Everything is easier when you are well rested, eat healthy food, get enough exercise and manage stress well.
  • Practice positive self-talk. Don't say anything to yourself that you wouldn't say to anyone else. Be kind and encouraging to yourself. 
  • Have a clearly defined purpose in life. If you're focused on, and working toward a goal, you will feel more positive.

 

Supplements for Success

GreenZoneThere are a number of Nature's Sunshine supplements to help you be healthy (and happier). You can find information about these products and purchase them in our online store:

  • Super Vitamins & Minerals
  • Zambroza
  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin B Complex
  • GreenZone
  • Zerenity
To your positive mindset and happiness!

For additional information, please email info@ramilas.com or call Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic at 613.829.0427 for an appointment.

References:

  1. Liu B, Flood S, Pirie K, Green J, Peto R, Beral V. for the Million Women Study Collaborators. Does happiness itself directly affect mortality? The prospective UK Million Women Study. Lancet 2016; 387:874-881. 
  2. Grady D. Happiness doesn't bring good health, study finds. New York Times, December 9, 2015. nytimes.com/2015/12/10/health/happiness-health-study.html?emc=eta1&_r=0
  3. Dispenza J. Breaking the Habit of Being Yourself. Carlsbad, CA: Hay House Inc., 2012.
  4. Clear J. 12 activities that boost positive thinking. jamesclear.com  Accessed May 16, 2016. 
  5. Mayo Clinic Staff. Positive thinking: stop negative self-talk to reduce stress. mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/positive-thinking/art-20043950 Accessed May 16, 2016. 
  6. Clear J. The science of positive thinking: how positive thoughts build your skill, boost your health, and improve your work. Huffington Post. huffingtonpost.com/james-clear/positive-thinking_b_3512202.html  Accessed May 16, 2016.
  7. Shimoff M, Kline C. Happy for No Reason. New York: Atria Paperback, 2008.

Disclaimer: The suggestions and recommendations in this newsletter are not intended to be prescriptive or diagnostic. The information is accurate and up to date to our knowledge, but we are not responsible for any errors in our sources of information.

 

Your thoughts are incredibly powerful. Choose yours wisely. - Joe Dispenza

Ramilas art is a timeless combination of traditional spiritual healing and neuroscience based on constant research. I have no doubt that Ramila’s healthcare practices are way ahead of their time and are the future of healthcare.
 
- Wares

 

When health begins, dis-ease ends.

Headaches - May 2011 - Volume 3 Issue 2

It seems that April, with our income tax deadline looming, is a good month to discuss headaches! Headaches can really dominate a person’s life when they’re severe. Fortunately, there is a lot we can do to avoid headaches and to reduce the severity of the headaches we don’t manage to escape entirely.
Read More